Wise Matchmaking Blog

Brooke’s Latest from The Huffington Post: “The Value of Valentine’s Day?”

Valentine's day 2016 2

Valentine’s Day is met each year with all manner of commentary.  Perhaps it’s good for the economy.  Florists do quite well.  Jewelers are busy.  Dim lit restaurants with ambiance make out (pardon the pun) like bandits.  In past years and past blogs, I have observed that there is no way out of Valentine’s Day if you are in a relationship.  I have also observed in past musings that the holiday is telling for those who have recently entered into a relationship.  This year, my observations are more relationship-centered.

For many of my clients in perhaps the strongest relationships, I have observed the following:  ‘We really have not figured it out yet.’  So naturally it would seem somewhat of a contradiction that the strongest relationships do not have the man with the plan of action.  The big night, without a detail missing, right down to the nostalgic restaurant.  Why is that?

In so many other thoughts, I have found that the man without the plan is less desirable because it might mean he has other, more important things to be doing.  Now, I am staring at the strongest relationships I know and there is no plan, no restaurant, no big gift.  ‘We’ll play it by year.’

Continue reading on the Huffington Post:  The Value of Valentine’s Day?





Brooke’s Latest from The Huffington Post: “The Big Commit”


Recently, I watched The Big Short, a film that explained the collapse of the Housing Market and the US Economy.  The film celebrated those who have conviction.  The heroes were the fund managers who broke convention, endured the wrath of colleagues, investors, and pundits alike, and remained steadfast in their belief that indeed the housing market was poised to collapse and the entire economy would go down with it.

There is a vast difference between those Wall Street visionaries whose conviction portended a horrible period for this country/world and the conviction discussed in this writing.  Dating would seem comparatively unimportant in the face of what happened to our world during and after the financial crisis.

Continue reading on the Huffington PostThe Big Commit




Brooke’s latest from the Huffington Post: “Exceptional You”

Man on phone (1)

You rose through the ranks of a Fortune 500 Company and now you are at the top of your professional game.  You save people’s lives through the practice of medicine.  Your entrepreneurial spirit has made you wealthier than you could have ever imagined.  You are a published author.  And so forth.

But you are in the same boat as the person who has to make that awkward first date phone call this evening…and your intelligence and life experience should inform your understanding that the first phone call should not be scrutinized, fact checked or otherwise picked apart in ways that have helped your analytical, discerning mind succeed professionally.

The phone call has nothing to do with that person’s professional success, resumé of accomplishments, or, most importantly, who they are as a human being.  The first phone call is not limited to a demographic or exclusive to a certain class of individual.  It’s the great equalizer.  So ‘you’ do not have to be any of the aforementioned masters to know what making that call is like.  This involves everybody.

The first phone call is difficult.  Yet, clients tell me it’s critical. Vital.  A deal-starter and even a deal-breaker.  If that’s the case, I think the first phone call’s importance might have to be reevaluated.  There’s no easy ice breakers in the game of dating, and those who easily break the ice could be perceived as far too smooth and experienced and self-assured, crossing the fine line between confident and arrogant.

We are bombarded by lists of the 20 qualities of the confident people, the 10 qualities of the extroverted people, the 15 qualities of the optimistic people, but please point me to the list of the qualities needed to forgive another’s first impression over a phone call.

Continue reading on the Huffington Post:  Exceptional You




Brooke’s latest from the Huffington Post: “How do you want to be remembered?”

Break up image 2

No matter how many dating enthusiasts or experts I approach about this topic, I cannot get a straight answer.  How do you break it off?

The common answer is not so simplistic.  It involves multiple variables, but two stand out.  The length of the relationship and the known emotions of the other person are important because you are telling them politely but honestly—“you are not in my future.” In a perfect world, it would end with those simple words.

The world’s far from perfect.  So how important, then, is the delivery…


You can take the Jerry Maguire approach, a crowded restaurant so there will not be a scene.

You can give the not so subtle clue of ‘we need to talk and can I come to your place to do it.’

There’s the ‘Costanza’—‘it’s not you, it’s me.’  No matter what, it is the other person, and keep in mind that the ‘Costanza’ approach is borrowed from a single man who wore a wedding ring to attract more women.

There’s the ‘epiphany’ approach: ‘this is not the man/woman I am supposed to be with and even though my timing cannot possibly be more wrong and inappropriate–post-funerals, pre-medical boards, in the middle of an exotic vacation, I have to let you know this right now.’

The ‘fade-away’, usually reserved for three dates or less, has been utilized for relationships longer than some marriages.  I am simply going to disappear, never ever going to speak with you again.  The ghost (so it is now called) would seem to be impossible these days with social media, but it happens, and it’s the methodology I hear most often used.

The ghost is likely the easy, safe and convenient way out or it can be viewed as the most merciful.  Nobody wants to tell someone that ‘I actually prefer brunettes’ or ‘their career is not impressive’ or that ‘I feel like I’m kissing a friend’ or ‘I just feel nothing.’  Honesty can cut someone to their core.  Mercifully fading away might be a good option if you find it a disservice to be anything but honest.  The answer for the break-up, from your perspective, is usually concrete and largely superficial.  So it might be the ‘right’ thing to spare someone your honesty.

Continue reading on the Huffington Post:  How Do You Want to Be Remembered?




Brooke’s latest from The Huffington Post: “Why Must Every Day be a Hallmark Holiday?”

My clients want someone to share their moments with.

“I was alone on Valentine’s day…”

“I am not a Mother/Father and I’ve lost mine, so Mother’s/Father’s Day is a reliable day of sadness, grief,….”

I wonder, however, if some have fallen into the trap of trying to capture and script the moment and, in so doing, the moment has eluded them.

When will the day come when we stop ruining the moment because we are too busy trying to capture it?

I read a great piece recently about American Pharoah’s Triple Crown triumph at Belmont. The author lamented that the Sports Illustrated cover commemorating the moment depicted spectators capturing the horse’s triumph through the lenses in their phones instead of viewing the moment through the lenses in their eyes.

We’re all guilty of this. The script has to be sent to the random guy you knew in high school. You haven’t spoken to him since high school because he was the random guy. But somehow, you are compelled to let him know all about it.

These seminal moments have to be captured for the benefit of someone with whom we feel apathetic towards at best.  Nonetheless, we still pause our lives for the benefit of an audience we do not know and who cares little for us.

Continue Reading on The Huffington Post:  Why Must Every Day be a Hallmark Holiday?